In the United States, for the last 10-15 years, “platelet transfusion” means “apheresis platelet transfusion.” Whole blood-derived platelets are used far less often, but Mark Yazer thinks that is a BIG mistake!


Dr. Mark Yazer

Dr. Mark Yazer

Dr. Mark Yazer from the Institute for Transfusion Medicine in Pittsburgh, PA joins Dr. Chaffin to discuss the use of whole blood-derived platelets. This is an irreverent, “heretical” conversation about whether or not the United States’ current strong preference for platelets from apheresis collections (apheresis-derived platelets, or “AD-platelets”) is justified. 20 years ago, platelets from whole blood collections (whole blood platelets, or “random donor platelets”) were commonly used, but today, 90% or more of platelets transfused in the U.S. are apheresis-derived.

But can we REALLY use whole blood platelets?

As a result of this strong preference, several pretty strongly-held beliefs have entered into common thoughts, and Mark takes great delight in helping us understand that most of them are just myths! The image below describes seven comparisons between whole blood platelets and apheresis platelets that he addresses in this interview, including hemostatic efficacy, risk of bacterial contamination, risk of TRALI, and risk of forming HLA antibodies (to name a few). This episode is informative and fun!

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DISCLAIMER and DISCLOSURES: The opinions expressed on this episode are those of my guest and I alone, and do not reflect those of the organizations with which either of us is affiliated. Dr. Yazer wanted to mention that he is on the Scientific Advisory Board for several companies including Terumo, Macopharma, Grifols, and Octapharma. I (Dr. Chaffin) have no relevant financial disclosures for this episode.

The image below covers Dr. Yazer’s main points in this episode.

Comparison of Apheresis and Whole Blood Platelets

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